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Assemblé Dancewear || Photojournalism

I have always had this notion, deep in my core, that perhaps I should have been a dancer. Or a drummer, but that’s another story. I have fairly long legs and noodle arms, and what could be more fitting than to use these physical attributes for ballet? Despite this feeling, I never did in fact take a ballet lesson. I did participate in Irish step dancing for seven years in my youth, but that, too, is another story.

Recently I photographed Assemblé Dancewear in Castle Rock, Colo. Noel Amend has been fitting dancers with pointe shoes for over 30 years. Folks travel from all around the region to have him outfit their feet in the shoes needed to plié, arabesque and generally float about the stage with the utmost of grace. While on assignment for the Denver Post local section, I made my way to Noel’s store and watched as he helped a couple different dancers of varying experience get equipped.

Assemblé Dancewear

Assemblé Dancewear

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Globeville Riverfront Arts Center || Photojournalism

One of my favorite settings to photograph is an artist’s studio. The messier the better. Tubes of paint, scraps of material, metals, and flakes of dried up clay on every surface, that is the dream. I love to photograph the textures and the colors and the intensity of an artist in the zone. So when my Denver Post colleague, Joe Vaccarelli, pitched a story featuring an arts center with upward of 50 different creative types packed within its halls, I quickly volunteered to join him on a tour.

Nicholas Emery

Nicholas Emery

Nicholas Emery

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Cherokee Ranch Arts Afield || Photojournalism

“They will drive us in, then we can walk back out whenever we’re ready.”

I looked down at my light sneakers — Keds to be precise — funky and classic footwear but not really that well-suited for a hike back from a canyon. I should have read the fine print on this assignment.

I was on the Cherokee Ranch & Castle grounds, 3,400 acres of beautiful nature near Sedalia, Colo., (oh and a castle, though we didn’t spend much time there on this particular day) that a group of artists was about to explore with paints and easels in hand. Along with reporter Joe Rubino, I was there to learn about the ranch’s Arts Afield program.

Cherokee Ranch Arts Afield

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Springtime on the local beat || Photojournalism

It is time, my fair friends, for an update on local journalism stories I’ve photographed recently for the YourHub section of the Denver Post. I curated these from a number of shoots I’ve been assigned since the turn of the new year into 2016. (Is that a phrase people use, “turn of the new year”? Maybe we should make it into a thing.)

Now that we are officially rocking the month of May, I thought it would be appropriate to include photos featuring planting little seedlings, creating new artistic works, and finishing up the school year. Summer will be soon upon us, so let’s all venture into gardens and take in the rich world.

Oh, and p.s. — I’ve got something of a new project in the works that I’ll be sharing with you soon. I just need to tinker away behind-the-scenes a little bit more, then will introduce you all so we can be best pals. Stay tuned!

YourHub Anya Semenoff

Alfonso Valenzuela references a breakfast order while preparing food at Ralston Road Cafe on February 18, 2016, in Arvada, Colorado. With ongoing and delayed redevelopment at the Ralston Creek site, several neighboring businesses have vacated their properties. However, Evan Marlangoutsos, owner of Ralston Road Cafe, intends to continue operating the restaurant.

YourHub Anya Semenoff

David Uhl works on a painting in his studio on April 20, 2016, in Golden, Colorado. David Uhl creates fine art oil paintings primarily focused on motorcycle art, aviation art and automotive art. He opened his Golden studio in 2008.

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Modern-day fencing || Photojournalism

Whenever I imagine fencing I think of a time centuries ago. Two fine gentleman are having a disagreement regarding a bad cup of tea and a scone lacking the proper ratio of currants to pastry and the only way to settle the manner like gentleman is to duel it out. So one removes a white glove from his jacket pocket and swings it at the opposing fellow and there you have it. They must duel. With thin, flashy dueling swords and fencing jackets with full-coverage masks.

Admittedly, my crazy mind is not exactly what you would call historically accurate, but since when has that stopped me. Recently I was able to join the young buccaneers of the Gateway High School fencing club for an assignment with the local section of the Denver Post. These teens were dedicated to this craft in way that was really fun to see. They don’t have a specific space open to them at the school, like a gym or a classroom, so they set up shop in one of the hallways, backdrop of brick and orange lockers. They take turns sparring and help each other learn better technique, all under the direction of teacher Kevin Heinrich.

gateway-fencing-001ae

gateway-fencing-003ae

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